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Discussion Starter #1
So my wife and I had a brake failure on the highway yesterday... which was fun. I have tested our vacuum pump with a gauge and we aren't getting any pressure from it. A couple of questions. 1. Does the vacuum pump run on an independent fuse that I can check or replace? 2. How much should I expect for a pro to replace the pump? 3. Is this the kind of part can replace myself? (I have mechanical experience with older cars).
Thanks!
Tim
 

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Welcome to the forum!

It is always helpful to specify the MY, and model, of your Evoque, so folks can better answer questions:)

Sorry to hear of your close call. Found the following in the service manual. Looks like the vacuum pump is mechanical.

Power assistance for the braking system is provided by a vacuum operated, non-active brake booster. The vacuum required for brake booster operation is created by an engine driven vacuum pump.

Rigid plastic piping connects the vacuum pump to the brake booster. Vehicles fitted with the stop/startsystem incorporate a brake vacuum sensor in the piping. A non return valve, installed on the front of the brake booster or in the brake vacuum sensor, maintains the vacuum necessary for brake booster operation.
 

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Here's an update to the story. I went to replace the part today and when I removed the original vacuum pump discovered that there was a part that seems to go between the camshaft and the vacuum pump that has been sheered off. I've included some photos for reference. Does anyone know what could have caused this and how to fix it?

Thanks again,
Tim

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image1.jpeg
 

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Another update. I spoke to an incredibly helpful Service Manager at our local Land Rover dealership, and he identified the part in question. He told me it was an inexpensive part and how to go about replacing it. It will be in stock on Friday. The one hitch is that I have to remove the remaining shaft of the bolt that is still inside the cam shaft. I'll update further when I get the part! Based on how amazing they have been on this project, if anyone is in the Boston area, I would definitely recommend Land Rover Peabody for service.
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After about three hours of work the job is complete. Here's a breakdown of how we fixed it.

The hardest part by a mile was the removal of the broken bolt inside the cam shaft. The Service Manager at Land Rover shared a youtube link that laid out of recommendations on how to remove it. Here is the link:

I ended up having to buy a few tools that I didn't have. The most important of which was a 90 degree drill attachment, as the space in the engine bay was extremely limited. We actually ended up removing the air filter housing to make a little more room.

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But even with the air filter housing removed, there wasn't enough room to get a standard size drill perpendicular to the bolt. This was the drill attachment that I bought. It was only $19, and the job would have been so much harder without it. I also bought a hinge drill bit set for $8.99 and a set of left handed drill bits for $8.49. I didn't know about left handed drill bits before this project, they are pretty interesting. Here's a brief description on itstillruns.com

Even with these additional tools it was a bear of a removal. In a moment of weakness I even drove the car down to the garage on the corner to see if the mechanic could help me remove the bolt. He told me he would have to remove the whole cam shaft from the engine, I would have to leave the car for several days, and he couldn't begin to give me a price. I wasn't into any of those three points so I brought the car home to continue the struggle.

The shaft of the bolt was extremely hard metal, and the visibility into the hole was terrible, but in the end the best method turned out to be drilling a few small holes into the shaft that let the left handed drill bits move rotate the bolt by degrees, little by little until I could grip it with my hand. Once it was out the rebuild took no time at all, and the brakes work perfectly now. While things were undone I did an air and oil filter change and an oil change.

All in all I spent $185.56 on the replacement pump and $36.48 on the additional tools, so just under $225 total. Plus a lot of swearing. That helped a lot.

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Discussion Starter #11
Yes, it worked great for me. As I said, the removal of the broken piece as a huge pain, but once it was out the rest of the job was smooth.
 

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I don’t know what the part is called, but it’s part number 6K269 from the dealership.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Just to clarify my above post, the part I just mentioned is the broken connection piece. The other part I needed was the brake vacuum pump. (The link is in the earlier post)
 
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