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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone,

My rover wouldn’t start and I had a timing code. I removed the valve cover and found that the locking pin on the VVT was broken. From my understanding, this is a somewhat common issue and Land Rover released a service bulletin. My question is, does anyone have information on how to go about replacing this? Thanks!
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It’s a bit of a major job friend. You have to remove valve cover, and all ancillary wiring etc. associated. Remover HP fuel pump and vacuum pump. Then when The top of the engine is clear and visible, then you need to set the timing with the timing tools to TDC. This involves a special tool set. It also I valves setting a pin through the block that touches the crank shaft at TDC. Problem is to place this pin, you have to remove the entire front left axle and mount.
once the crank shaft pin is screwed in, remove the starter and place the set tool from kit onto the fly wheel exposed by removing starter. Then set top cams at TDC with tool kit. Then remove crank pulley.
after removing crank pulley, remove intake air tube. Then remove all bolts (about 15) from timing cover. Remove timing cover. Then remove the timing chain tensioner and guides.
then remove timing chain.
Then loosen cam bearing /carrier guide bolts in sequence from inside out, just broken loose. Inside to out in diagonal pattern back and forth, then after broken remove each. Make sure you notate the position of each carrier/guide and do not mix them up.
after removing these, the cam is free to be removed. Remove intake cam.
Then remove the VCT and replace and ensure you use the new diamond washers that should be in the New kit. tighten to spec. Then place cam exactly back the way you found it and set TDC with cam timing tool. Replace guides and chain going from bottom clockwise you towards cams and back down. Install new tensioner. Release tensioner.
Then put everything back On. Check for vacuum leaks. oh and if you remove the injectors buy new injector seals.

this is NOT a shade tree job. It is an intense tear down of the engine and timing. If you’ve never dealt with timing an engine, or replacing cams etc. I would recommend really going slow or ensuring the help of a knowledgeable friend. Otherwise you can smoke your engine easily if done wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you for all the great details, Htown! I did try to tackle this job, only because I’m afraid the engine has internal damage and I just wanted to give this a try before replacing the engine. I got the new parts in it and it didn’t resolve anything. My question now is could I replace the engine with a Ford 2.0 ecoboost from a fusion, escape, or other models? Or would it have to be from a Land Rover? The motor in my car says “FoMoCo” everywhere and appears to be the same engine as the Ford vehicles.

Thanks again!
 

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You can absolutely use the FOMOCO 2.0 engine from the same year etc. You of course will have to transfer to Range Rover parts as appropriate.
With that said, I’m curious on two things. What was the exact codes (and were they pulled with a general,scan tool or did you have a scanner that can pull LR Specific codes in each canbus module)......And when you replaced the VV cam sprocket, did you ensure you reinstalled at TDC? The only way I know to do this is to mark the cam position when secured with the TDC TOOL KIT with paint pen markings in many spots so when you reinstall, it will be exactly correct.

Also did you replace or check / scope the crank position sensor and Cam position sensors?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well, I planned on doing the job correctly. I purchased the timing tools and took my time, however about half way in it started going poorly. I couldn’t get the camshafts to align and ended up breaking the cast iron end of the back one. That piece then fell in one of the cylinders. It wouldn’t stick to a magnet because it was cast iron and I couldn’t retrieve it. At that point I decided I’d just put it back together and see what happened, because I figured it needed an engine anyway. I didn’t take the axle off to insert the remaining timing tool either. The car tried to turn over, but I believe the engine is locked. When I try to start it, it will short out the starter. I can take the starter out and reconnect the wiring, but I happens again.
 

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Yikes. Bad news there. FOMOCO designed about the worst engine possible to time and replace major components. Without setting the engine to top dead center, it’s a crap shoot at best to put it back together after removing a cam and have timing be good. I would bet if you used a 23mm wrench on the cams you could have managed to move the cams enough to insert the cam TDC Tool just enough.
With you breaking the cam, which in turn turns the fuel pump, I would say you have two options if you haven’t ran the engine or gotten it to start yet.
First is to tear down the engine and use the proper tools to set TDC and remove the head. Inspect all components and replace all gaskets and seals. Remove the metal piece. Replace the cams etc. etc. and ensure you’ve got them at TDC.
Second option is to replace engine. Truthfully, replacing the engine is more work. You have to remove even more t disconnect it from transmission. Only upside is that you can easily replace everything that leaks etc.
Goes without saying, never run an engine with metal pieces in the cylinder.
 

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It’s a bit of a major job friend. You have to remove valve cover, and all ancillary wiring etc. associated. Remover HP fuel pump and vacuum pump. Then when The top of the engine is clear and visible, then you need to set the timing with the timing tools to TDC. This involves a special tool set. It also I valves setting a pin through the block that touches the crank shaft at TDC. Problem is to place this pin, you have to remove the entire front left axle and mount.
once the crank shaft pin is screwed in, remove the starter and place the set tool from kit onto the fly wheel exposed by removing starter. Then set top cams at TDC with tool kit. Then remove crank pulley.
after removing crank pulley, remove intake air tube. Then remove all bolts (about 15) from timing cover. Remove timing cover. Then remove the timing chain tensioner and guides.
then remove timing chain.
Then loosen cam bearing /carrier guide bolts in sequence from inside out, just broken loose. Inside to out in diagonal pattern back and forth, then after broken remove each. Make sure you notate the position of each carrier/guide and do not mix them up.
after removing these, the cam is free to be removed. Remove intake cam.
Then remove the VCT and replace and ensure you use the new diamond washers that should be in the New kit. tighten to spec. Then place cam exactly back the way you found it and set TDC with cam timing tool. Replace guides and chain going from bottom clockwise you towards cams and back down. Install new tensioner. Release tensioner.
Then put everything back On. Check for vacuum leaks. oh and if you remove the injectors buy new injector seals.

this is NOT a shade tree job. It is an intense tear down of the engine and timing. If you’ve never dealt with timing an engine, or replacing cams etc. I would recommend really going slow or ensuring the help of a knowledgeable friend. Otherwise you can smoke your engine easily if done wrong.
Hello! Such a good explanation of the work needs to be done. I just did this work on my ‘16 discovery with the same 2.0 Ford engine. Well, took me a 4-5 days to disassemble and assemble. Removing the shaft (especially the bottom arm) was a real pain.
I would need your advise. I used a special tools, put a bolt to crankshaft and while in TDC aligned the camshafts. I replaced chain, tensioner, guides, both sprockets and all 4 diamond washers (2 bottom sprocket and 2 on the upper sprockets).
Assembled, runs perfect, smooth. But I do have a lot of errors, I was trying to delete them with my torque app and cheap Bluetooth obd reader, but they didn’t go off.

Most of the errors due to high circuit, which is understandable (might need some ride to them to be cleaned)?
One of the errors is P0016 which is crank cam position correlation.
Does the ECM needs to be relearned after replacing the sprockets?
Here are screenshots of the errors and some pics during the assembling
 

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You need more than a generic scanner to reset the factory codes usually. In respect to the 0016 code, cam crank correlation, the only true way to be 100 percent timing was set properly, is to picoscope the sensors and see them graphed out in time and reference the waveforms to make sure they are indeed in time. If you used the tool, my guess is it is timed correct and might require a ECU programming reflash or resetting / recalibration of parameters perhaps to eliminate code.
 

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You need more than a generic scanner to reset the factory codes usually. In respect to the 0016 code, cam crank correlation, the only true way to be 100 percent timing was set properly, is to picoscope the sensors and see them graphed out in time and reference the waveforms to make sure they are indeed in time. If you used the tool, my guess is it is timed correct and might require a ECU programming reflash or resetting / recalibration of parameters perhaps to eliminate code.
yes, I tried another scan tool that erased all the codes, but p0016 and p0017 are still there.
The car drivers great, have you reset your ECM when you changed the chain and all the components ?
 
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