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Hello all,
I have a 2015 Range Rover Evoque, pure plus... with 8,000 miles, non of which I have driven in the snow. I live in Colorado and we are coming up on our winter season and would like some information ...tips or tricks re: driving the evoque in the snow. I never bothered to ask the salesman this question, and won't see anybody at the dealership until next week. So here it goes: When driving in the snow I read that terrain response in snow is best used for light snow and deep snow it is best to use the mud selection, does anybody disagree with this information? I previously had a Honda CRV all wheel drive, I never had to think about making any snow selections. My questions : Does the car know what to select or must I make the selection? Does it cause a quick down shift or anything scary when you need to select something else? Must you pull over to make a change in the terrain response?
 

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Change on the fly. The snow, sand setting makes sure the AWD couple is already active. It also lessens the throttle sensitivity. It works very well. Last winter, when the transmission was acting poorly, this was the only time it behaved well. I have also used this mode in heavy downpours to great advantage. If you drive in snow conditions routinely, you can just leave it in that setting. Finally buy a set of dedicated snows to truly take advantage of the vehicles abilities. Stock rubber may be fine snow, anything icy needs softer winter rubber. Difference is profound. You don't get in accidents because you can't climb. You get in accidents because you can't stop or slide unexpectedly.
 

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So if I don't make any changes initially, the vehicle will change it for me while I'm driving? We had a "little" storm here in Denver today...but nothing that would give me the opportunity to test this thing out. Thanks for the snow tire advice.
 

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To a certain extent. Personally, I don't like FWD, so by putting it into the sand/snow mode, the center differential is already active and the throttle is smoother for the slippery conditions. Like hitting a puddle and drivetrain reacts v drivetrain already being coupled. Its milleseconds. Play with it next snow.
 

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First off, it's actually grass/gravel/snow mode, not sand/snow. Sand is its own mode with a very different response. I've never heard of using mud-ruts mode for deep snow, but somewhere I heard sand mode, which allows for more wheel spin, might work better for deep snow. Anybody know more about best deep snow settings?

Secondly, only some Sport and FF Range Rovers can automatically select terrain response modes via the more advanced Terrain Response 2. Otherwise if you leave it in normal (off) mode, it will switch from FWD to AWD if you're going below 22 mph, if your wheels are slipping, or if it's really cold out.

-- Paul
 

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Thanks Paul. The weakness of traction control in deep snow is you often need to get thru the snow to a firmer base. You effectively do that with a controlled amount of wheelspin. Sand mode is better for deep snow.

The G/G/S settings strength is the smoother throttle response allowing you to not lose grip by inducing wheelspin. (Wish they just called it "low traction mode". Instead of being a FWD car till slippage has already occurred, that center couple is already active and doing its job (VERY WELL I MIGHT ADD).. Rain is low traction. Hard pack snow, black ice etc are low traction. Gravel on hillsides is low traction. Wet grass is definitely low traction.
If I am correct the sand mode basically shuts off TC and probably effectively locks the center diff for maximum 4WD effect. I'd love an expert to add to this as its all pretty in the manual and video, but I like the technical. Same scenario occurs in both deep sand and deep snow. Often as long as you maintain forward momentum you're OK. If you stop you're done. Having TC curb wheelspin effectively kills any momentum.
Not being an off roader, I love the technical description of mud/ruts mode. Doesn't it hold lower gears so you have higher torque potential and limits speed??
 
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